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applied design, Museum of Modern Art, new york (US)

Museum of Modern Art
11 W 53rd St, New York (US)

March 2, 2013 -  January 20, 2014


There are still people who think that design is just about making things, people, and places pretty. In truth, design has spread to almost every facet of human activity, from science and education to politics and policymaking, for a simple reason: one of design’s most fundamental tasks is to help people respond to change. A designer today can choose to focus on interactions, interfaces, the Internet, visualizations, socially minded infrastructures and products, 5-D spaces, bioengineering, sustainability, video games, critical scenarios, and yes, even furniture. Several outstanding examples of this vitality and diversity are presented in this installation.

Also on display are 14 videogames—including Pac-Man, The Sims, and Katamari Damacy—that constitute the beginning of a new branch of MoMA’s collection.

applied design moma museum of modern art new york dirk vander kooij marcel wanders Massoud Hassani paola antonelli recycled robot print

“[Since becoming a curator in 1994, my view of design has] definitely moved more towards the ‘five-dimensional.’ The common thread is always how people live and what design can do to make life better. If design has more to say in the immaterial realm then I focus on that. I can’t deny that furniture excites me less and less. I still get excited by some pieces, like Dirk Vander Kooij‘s ‘Endless Flow’ rocking chair of 2011.

There needs to be innovation in the process and in the material because otherwise how many more chairs do we need? You need to justify your use of physical resources and your occupation of space with real innovation, real talent, and even fantasy and delight. I’m not so much of a moralist to think everything needs a purpose.”

–Paola Antonelli, director of research and development and senior curator of architecture and design at MoMA, in an interview with Ermanno Rivetti that appears in this month’s issue of The Art Newspaper

 


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